© Betty Sederquist:
Stop the Slaughter of Whales and Dolphins
© Betty Sederquist:
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Dolphin + Whale Project

The Problem 

Whales and dolphins continue to be killed around the world and need our help. Japan, Iceland, and Norway kill more than 1,000 minke, fin, and other great whale species every year, all for meager sales of whale meat. Thousands of dolphins are still killed every year in Japan for meat, and in Indonesia and Peru for shark bait. Whales and dolphins continue to be captured in Russia, Cuba, and Japan for export to captivity facilities. Despite a ban on captures and export, dolphins around the Solomon Islands still face threats of capture, slaughter and export, as is illustrated in the adjacent video, "Pillaging the Solomons". 

Our Action Campaign 

We have a long history of working within the International Whaling Commission (IWC) to end commercial whaling. In 1982, we helped pass a moratorium on commercial whaling. We publish a daily newsletter, ECO, at IWC meetings, which is the voice for whales and the environmental community. We work with grassroots groups to educate local fishermen about the need to stop the killing of dolphins and sharks. And we support the growing efforts for watching wild dolphins and whales rather than killing them. We support community efforts to replace dolphin killing with dolphin tourism in places like the Solomon Islands, and fight to block the import and export to captivity of wild dolphins, belugas, and orca whales.

Current Challenges 

Commercial whaling, undertaken under the guise of “scientific” whaling, must be stopped. Japan is planning more illegal whaling in Antarctica, in defiance of the legal ruling against the country in the International Court of Justice at the Hague. Iceland and Norway are also defiant. We work to stop the import of wild belugas captured in Russia for U.S. captivity facilities, and to blow the whistle on live dolphin exports from the cruel “cove” drive hunts to places such as Dubai and China. We continue to monitor the situation in the Solomon Islands to ensure that the current ban on the capture and export of dolphins is upheld. 

Navy Deploys Captive Dolphins to Capture Vaquitas

Navy Deploys Captive Dolphins to Capture Vaquitas

Laura Bridgeman, October 2017

As part of a misguided effort to save the nearly extinct Vaquita porpoise, captive dolphins who are kept in captivity by the United States Navy have been transported to Mexico and will begin the process of locating and assisting in the capture of Vaquitas to establish a captive breeding colony, a very dubious proposition.

Over the next month, dolphins called by the Navy “Andrea”, “Fathom”, “Katrina” and “Splash” will be locating the porpoises so that they can be captured and kept in a 46 square-meter seapen in San Felipe, Baja California. Note that these dolphins live in the same Navy facility in San Diego that came under fire recently for its poor treatment of dolphins.

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What Trump's Attack Against National Monuments Means for Oceans

What Trump's Attack Against National Monuments Means for Oceans

Sharon Ryals Tamm, October 2017

The Washington Post’s leak of Interior Dept. Secretary Zinke’s preliminary report to Trump revealed recommendations to reduce size and change management of several National Monuments, re-opening them to commercial fishing, grazing, logging, etc. This is the first punch of a two fisted attack Trump launched against National Monuments and Sanctuaries last spring.

The other punch was Trump’s directive to NOAA under the Dept. of Commerce to review all National Marine Sanctuaries and Monuments specifically to open them to oil and gas extraction. The public comment period on NOAA’s review ended August 15th with results not yet released—they are expected this coming month.

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CAMPAIGN HIGHLIGHTS

Stop the Slaughter of Dolphins and Whales! Sign the Petition

Stop the Slaughter of Dolphins and Whales! Sign the Petition

Whaling is a cruel, outdated practice. Hunting and killing dolphins for food and captivity has been proven as being inhumane. We demand that the IWC to include small cetaceans in their purview and advocate for increased cetacean protection.

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Its Now Illegal to Import Belugas from Sea of Okhotsk

Its Now Illegal to Import Belugas from Sea of Okhotsk

The depleted designation now makes it illegal to import any belugas from this population into the United States for public display, including belugas captured from this stock that are already in captivity and their offspring.

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Watch Whales In Iceland, But Don't Eat Them!

Watch Whales In Iceland, But Don't Eat Them!

Did you know that one of the biggest supporters of the Icelandic whaling industry is tourism? Learn what you can do to avoid supporting this inhumane practice.

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